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FAME-VISUKAL

Sure it's a högoddsare, but "Fame - Visukal" by Silent Theatre, National Theatre's sign language ensemble, can be the best musical set 2012.

Right unexpectedly, perhaps, the Silent Theatre, National Theatre ensemble Sign Language for deaf, hearing impaired and sign language, may have made the year's best musical.

But there it is. Though this is called the "visukal" and the experience is as visual as musical, though it is also, with excellent singers, an energetic small orchestra and a vibrant dance-pressure. Visukalen included in a monthly sign language activities in Orebro, capital of Hearing People's Federation (DHB).

The whole fame-school famous garniture of teachers and students are here, easily recognizable in an ensemble which blends dance scenes, responsive and fun choreographed by the dancers' conditions of Ambra Succi from Bounce, with frequent skits in which the characters emerge: Amina Ouahid, a strong sign operator the obstinate dance student Carmen Diaz, Romel Belcher on that beautiful street dancing illiterate Tyrone, Mia Ray as serious Mabel. Ronny Patrick Jacobsen is Nick, overwrought drama student together with the mercury Snabbe Kalle Nilsson, Joe and ambitious Serena (Maria Simonsson).

The music teacher Linus Lindman interpreter sing beautifully for silent actors. Jenny Norén's voice lifts the show in the role of "Lambchops," music student with excellent Themba Tainton and Christian Dywik in a noisy little band.

Veronica Björnstrand control the game and the school as Principal Sherman, July af Klint's dance teacher demonstrates sign language humor.

Speaking and signing actors play freely against each other, making interpretation perfectly inserted in the game, so that in a dialogue the speakers sometimes interpret the drawing and vice versa. Just a little mic on the cheek shows the difference.

Game Center is a professional interpreter Tommy Fransson (whose sign language interpretation of the Eurovision Song Contest is a näthit), in the added role of interpreter schools, which students engage with their calls when needed (and discourage out when he folds in ...)

But the master behind it all is Josette Bushell Mingo, Silent Theatre director and director, who, with his eye for the actor's character and abilities and their simultaneous capacity has been twisted together a highly intelligent multi spectacle of numbers and characters.

The small clips of the game, which is also followed in the live broadcast on TV screens, she succeeds and the actors do double the interpreter force (speech to signs, signs to speech for a deaf and hearing audiences) to an artistic plus, a self-commentary part of the show which adds an extra dimension and makes Örebro worth a trip, whether you yourself are related or not. The audience responds with long, standing ovation, silence as well as loud.

 

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